Texas Rangers Prospect Series: Part 1, Josh Jung and Sam Huff

Sam Huff, photo and edit by @bigedmachine

With the announcement that there isn’t going to be a minor league season in 2020, I wanted to take a closer look at the top prospects in the Rangers organization who were added to the 60-man roster. While most of these players won’t begin the season with the Rangers, it’s still important to highlight them since they are likely to be pieces on the Rangers next championship team.  

Josh Jung, 3B  

The least surprising prospect addition to the Ranger’s 60-man roster was 2019 draftee Josh Jung . While I don’t think he’ll break camp with the club, he should get another opportunity next season because of how advanced his bat is. The three year starter at Texas Tech has a very upright stance, good (but not great) batspeed, and his way of getting to the ball looks a little unorthodox, but nonetheless, he still has the ability to make hard contact all across the field. Defensively speaking, he shouldn’t be a liability at third and even showed the ability to play shortstop his final year at Texas Tech. When you look at the sum of his parts, you’ll see that he compares favorably to a guy like Justin Turner. Rangers fans should expect him to hit for a high average, develop 25-30 home run power, and provide stable league average defense with the potential to move to first base, outfield, or designated hitter.  

Sam Huff, C 

Huff’s breakout 2019 campaign established him as one of the best catching prospects in baseball. Across two levels, he hit .278 with 28 homers and an .845 ops with the high point of the season being when he was named MVP of the Futures Game. Despite all he accomplished last season, Huff won’t make the 30-man roster and it might even be a stretch to say that he’ll get called up in 2021. Unlike Jung, Huff’s hit tool is a lot shakier and there’s a question as to where his defensive home might end up being. I believe that the Rangers should consider moving him to first base or designated hitter because at 6’4 230 lbs, he is too big to be a major league catcher. Also, this decision would allow for him to get called up quicker since first baseman don’t play a premium defensive position such as catcher.  

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